You Are Not Paid to Write Code

You Are Not Paid to Write Code

Every time you write code or introduce third-party services, you are introducing the possibility of failure into your system.
I think the same can safely be said of code—more code, more problems.

almost anything is easier to get into than out of. When we introduce new systems, new tools, new lines of code, we’re with them for the long haul. It’s like a baby that doesn’t grow up.

We’re not paid to write code, we’re paid to add value (or reduce cost) to the business. Yet I often see people measuring their worth in code, in systems, in tools—all of the output that’s easy to measure.

the siloing of responsibilities. Product, Platform, Infrastructure, Operations, DevOps, QA—whatever the silos, it’s created a sort of responsibility lethargy. “I’m paid to write software, not tests” or “I’m paid to write features, not deploy and monitor them.” Things of that nature.

I think this is only addressed by stewarding a strong engineering culture and instilling the right values and expectations.

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